Minimalism?

I am so tired of reading articles that advocate ‘decluttering’ a wardrobe, of culling all clothes not worn in the past 6 months or year at the latest.  What a waste and how tragic.

The ‘four pile’ approach of

.Keep   .Mend   .Donate   .Throw

……….Works to a degree.

 

But what about

 

.Buy with real thought   .Love   .Mend   .Store carefully

 

 

Using this as a guideline all guilt is removed from shopping, it is certainly a much more cost effective way of building a wardrobe and you will have a varied, extensive selection of clothes.

Today I am wearing a skirt that is 15 years old.  It is an old French Connection piece bought in London whilst visiting my cousin.  I still love it.  It doesn’t come out every year but every other year it has an airing.  This Spring I am wearing it with a newly aquired Brora mohair cardigan in electric blue.  I chose the cardigan with the skirt in mind.

 

There is a trick to running this kind of wardrobe

 

.Ensure that you really fall in love with each item bought. Do not hand over any money unless you cannot live without the garment.  This is key.

.Make sure that the colour flatters your skin tone.

.Wash and mend items with love and care

.Store well

.Take photographs of all items and create an album, whether digitally or in print form. 

 

Each change in season I remind myself of what I already own.  This Spring I have brought out two pairs of linen trousers in brown.  I have to admit they haven’t made it to the wardrobe in three years but this time round I LOVE  them.  My style can fluctuate from year to year. They match beautifully with a linen jacket from last summer Toast. Contrary to what you may imagine my wardrobe is not full to bursting for I select certain items each season.  I may rotate clothes from storage to wardrobe several times during that season but my wardrobe is never crushingly full for, at this point, you cannot see the woods for the trees!  You find you have literally nothing to wear when the doors of the wardrobe will not close.

 

This kind of wardrobe management may not be for everyone but I just love to go ‘shopping’ in my storage cases.  I can create a whole new look without handing over my money.  More importantly I have fallen in love with every item that I own.  Nothing is wasted. AND I am never at a loss for something to wear.

 

 

This approach DOES require good management and good storage – and that is all.

Have you noticed how every garment these days seems to be ‘dry clean only’?  I detest the smell of the dry cleaning chemicals and so my choice of clothing has been seriously reduced.

I do believe, having read hundreds of labels that the ‘dry clean only’ stamp is attached without a valid reason.  Why oh why would a crisp cotton dress require chemicals over and above a sluice of lovely warm water?

 

Taffeta and viscose rayon do seem to require a visit to the cleaners.  Wool skirts, trousers and suits and very delicate silks also fall into this bracket but other than that most fabrics will be fine in a cool handwash with a delicate detergent.

 

I must admit I am a bit of a hand wash queen.   All of my underwear, hosiery and cashmere are no stranger to my sink and Ecover or Stergene hand wash.  I enjoy the process and my treasured items do seem to last so much longer.  I wash everything inside out and with as much time and care as I can offer on the day in question.  A very short spin in a mesh bag takes away excess moisture and then I lay all items flat on a towel, usually positioned on my airer.  Never dry items on the radiator.  It will ruin elastic.

Before opting for the sink or dry cleaners do air the garment in question by an open window.  It maybe that a blast of fresh air will allow the item another outing before cleaning.  Clothes do actually last longer if not submitted to an endless cleaning process.  This is no excuse for stained and marked clothes however!

 

Steaming is another excellent way to refresh clothing.  Most women who are serious about collecting and maintaining beautiful clothing should own one.  They come in at about £99.00.

For more interesting information on this matter click on the following link.  You may find the customer comments at the end very interesting.

http://conversation.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/dry-cleaning-only-labels-using-washing-machine/

Dry clean only?

Have you noticed how every garment these days seems to be dry clean only?  I detest the smell of the dry cleaning chemicals and so my choice of clothing has been seriously reduced.

I do believe, having read hundreds of labels that the ‘dry clean only’ stamp is attached without a valid reason.  Why oh why would a crisp cotton dress require chemicals over and above a sluice of lovely warm water?

 

 

Taffeta and viscose rayon do seem to require a visit to the cleaners.  Wool skirts, trousers and suits and very delicate silks also fall into this bracket but other than that most fabrics will be fine in a cool handwash with a delicate detergent.

 

I must admit I am a bit of a hand wash queen.   All of my underwear, hosiery and cashmere are no stranger to my sink and Ecover or Stergene hand wash.  I enjoy the process and my treasured items do seem to last so much longer.  I wash everything inside out and with as much time and care as I can offer on the day in question.  A very short spin in a mesh bag takes away excess moisture and then I lay all items flat on a towel, usually positioned on my airer.  Never dry items on the radiator.  It will ruin elastic.

Before opting for the sink or dry cleaners do air the garment in question by an open window.  It maybe that a blast of fresh air will allow the item another outing before cleaning.  Clothes do actually last longer if not submitted to an endless cleaning process.  This is no excuse for stained and marked clothes however!

 

Steaming is another excellent way to refresh clothing.  Most women who are serious about collecting and maintaining beautiful clothing should own one.  They come in at about £99.00.

For more interesting information on this matter click on the following link.  You may find the customer comments at the end very interesting.

http://conversation.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/dry-cleaning-only-labels-using-washing-machine/